8 Reasons to Adopt A Senior Dog

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Dogs that usually have trouble getting adopted are the ones with a little more grey on their muzzles. Our bias earns these dogs the tag of being “less adoptable.”

Dogs that are seven years or older are regarded as seniors.  Unfortunately, dogs five or older have a harder time getting adopted.  Most people prefer adopting puppies. Puppies, however, can be a handful, and many people don’t realize how much more effort goes into training a puppy.

Adopting a senior dog can prove to be an enriching experience for both you and your family. Here are eight reasons for adopting a senior dog:

1. They are Accustomed to Human Routine

Adopting a senior dog could mean that you spend less time training the dog and more time bonding with it. They are often experienced and trained to obey basic commands like sit, stay, and the all-important no.  A senior dog will not be as energetic and frisky as its younger counterpart, but that could be a good thing if you are looking for a more sedate companion.

 

2. What You See Is What You Get

When adopting a dog for a family, it is important to know the nature and personality of the dog. Does he do well with children? How is he with strangers? Will he be loyal or aggressive? These are important  questions to ask.  A senior dog already has his personality established, which you can gauge with a short walk outside, and a few visits to the shelter

    They Cost Less

An older dog, as opposed to a young dog or puppy, will cost less in adoption fees quite simply because there is less demand for them. But once you get one home you’ll realize what a great deal you have landed. Spend the cash you save on getting some delicious treats for your pooch or some toys that will help him acclimatize.

    They Are Always up for a Cuddle

 Senior dogs are usually not as energetic as younger ones. They tend to enjoy their time spent lazing on the couch, in front of the TV, or just sprawled out under the sun on your veranda. If they find you in bed with a book, do not be surprised if they snuggle up to you for a nap. These dogs, to a great extent, are self-sufficient and have little need for round-the-clock engagement like puppies do. That is not to say that they won’t need exercise, but instead of a power walk they will not mind a long stroll.

    No More Surprises to Clean

 Older dogs are usually housebroken.

    Train Them with Ease

 Have you ever heard the saying, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Well, that seems to not hold true for dogs as much as it does for humans. Older dogs have considerably longer attention spans and can learn faster than puppies or younger dogs.

    They Are Loyal to a Fault

 When you adopt a senior dog, he not only looks up at you as his companion but as someone who gave him a better life. This is one bond that is not easily broken.

    You Can Save A Life

 Adopting a dog from a shelter makes you a life saver.

When you go to the shelter to adopt a dog, try to go in the middle of the week. Most shelters are busy with visitors on weekends making the animals anxious and loud. If you want a better idea of the personality of the dog take him out for a short walk. Do not make prolonged eye-contact with him. Talk to him, and sit with him so that he can get used to your presence and scent.

When you bring your new friend home, you will be glad you did.

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