GROW-FRESH™-QUALITY ALUMINIUM POLYCARBONATE GREENHOUSES

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What Is The Difference Between All The Panel Fixing methods? Which Is The Best?

Below is an honest guide of polycarbonate panel fixing- From The Best To The Worst

There are many methods of retaining polycarbonate sheeting onto greenhouse frames. We will list just a few below, in order of most favourable to least.

1st PLACE- 'STRIP LOCK' PANEL INSERTION SYSTEM

This is a method only found on the highest quality greenhouses as it is more expensive to manufacture. Full lengths of UV treated PVC locking strips are clamped around the panel fully encapsulating them and then held in tightly against the frame by thick aluminium extrusions. This method of fixing the panels to the frame is the only way to guarantee you will not lose panels or have them blow away and be damaged, even in the most severe winds. Because the PVC is UV treated, it will never break down and as with all our 6mm polycarbonate panels, we offer 12 years warranty on the PVC component. We use the 'strip locking' method on our 'Stanford Series' 6mm poly greenhouses and we are the only company to offer this innovation in Australia. This method was pioneered in the UK (greenhouse capital of the world), by the leading greenhouse design team. It is strong enough to hold in huge panes of glass, in fact this is what it was first designed for. Hands down this is the best method for fixing any polycarbonate or glass because of the clever design and resulting strength. Superior longevity and wind resistance. Overall a winning design and definitely the best on the market today.  PH 1300 GO GROW TO ARRANGE A VIEWING!!

2nd PLACE- SLOTTED CHANNELS

Our base model (4mm Somerset Series) utilises slotted channels for the panels to slide into because it is relatively efficient and very cost effective to produce. This allows us to offer a range to our consumers in the lowest price bracket whilst still providing quality. This is still a good method for small residential greenhouses but if you live in an open area, somewhere that is susceptible to high winds or you want something a little bit heavy duty, then you cannot beat the 'strip-locking' of our Stanford Series greenhouses. With the slotted channel method of fixing, the aluminium extrusions of the greenhouse have small recesses in which the panels slide into. Through our many years of experience I can say that the only downside to slotted channels is that the panels can pop out and get damaged during high winds. We have made an improvement to our new Somerset Series where we have actually increased the depth of the channels so the poly panels are more firmly held in place than others on the market utilising this method. Another downside is that becuase the panels are slid tightly into channels, there is no allowance for the application of silicon as it just gets forced out when the panel is inserted. With our Stanford Series greenhouses, there are actual silicon recesses for generous application and we believe this is crucial in any wind prone areas. Overall the slotted channel method comes in second.

3rd PLACE- SPRING CLIPS

Spring clips are the least favourable method of fixing the poly panels to the frame. This is because they are only placed at spaced intervals down the panels and are very easily dislodged in wind. This results in your panels blowing out and in turn becoming damaged. We would not use this method for any of our greenhouses and would not recommend purchasing a greenhouse which relies on spring clips as the glazing fixture. This method gets a thumb down from us.

 

At Grow-Fresh™ Greenhouses, we only use the most advanced methods in the industry and only sell products we would be proud to own ourselves :-)

View our great range of greenhouse and accessories in our Grow-Fresh Greenhouses Store

OR FREECALL 1300 GO GROW (1300 46 4769) WITH ANY ENQUIRIES...THANKS FOR LOOKING

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