Importance of Rifle Gun Scope Cover with not Hunting & Shooting

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Is that a branch Elk or a scratch in the lens?

 

 

 

Hunting these days isn’t the same as it was in Grandpa’s days, when a man could bring down game at over 100 yards with iron sights, every day. Today many hunters, including youngsters don’t even start shooting with iron sights, but start right in with a riflescope. It’s about the same issue as a new driver learning with an automatic transmission. That’s all fine and dandy, but just wait until there is a necessity for that driver to have to jump behind the wheel of a Jeep Wrangler!

 

The same goes for scopes, but heck, this article isn’t about learning to shoot, it’s about what you are shooting with, the riflescope. It’s not all about the fancy high powered rifle, or the caliber of the round, it’s about whether or not you can actually place that round in the kill zone, or for the target shooter, the center ring. Our scopes are getting so much more critical, and with adjustments and light capabilities, the long-range shots we can make are forever.

 

But have you ever gotten prone, set up a shot that you know you could make, brought that rifle to a good rest for stability, looked through that scope and brought that animal into the crosshairs and shook your head in disbelief? You were pretty sure that there was a branch on that bulls head, but now through your scope it looked like a right angle tree branch or something. As you brought the scope onto another target, sure enough, there was that same tree branch. Damn! There’s either something on my scope lens, or it’s scratched.

 

The way to never have this happen to you is with a scope cover. Simply, look into buying a stretchy neoprene cover for it that will keep it clean as well as keep it dry during rainy spells.


See a variety of scopes and accessories HERE

 

Hunting these days isn’t the same as it was in Grandpa’s days, when a man could bring down game at over 100 yards with iron sights, every day. Today many hunters, including youngsters don’t even start shooting with iron sights, but start right in with a riflescope. It’s about the same issue as a new driver learning with an automatic transmission. That’s all fine and dandy, but just wait until there is a necessity for that driver to have to jump behind the wheel of a Jeep Wrangler!

 

The same goes for scopes, but heck, this article isn’t about learning to shoot, it’s about what you are shooting with, the riflescope. It’s not all about the fancy high powered rifle, or the caliber of the round, it’s about whether or not you can actually place that round in the kill zone, or for the target shooter, the center ring. Our scopes are getting so much more critical, and with adjustments and light capabilities, the long-range shots we can make are forever.

 

But have you ever gotten prone, set up a shot that you know you could make, brought that rifle to a good rest for stability, looked through that scope and brought that animal into the crosshairs and shook your head in disbelief? You were pretty sure that there was a branch on that bulls head, but now through your scope it looked like a right angle tree branch or something. As you brought the scope onto another target, sure enough, there was that same tree branch. Damn! There’s either something on my scope lens, or it’s scratched.

 

The way to never have this happen to you is with a scope cover. Simply, look into buying a stretchy neoprene cover for it that will keep it clean as well as keep it dry during rainy spells.

 

 

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