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Details about  CROUCHING TIGER HIDDEN DRAGON DVD Special Edition Widescreen 4 Academy Awards

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CROUCHING TIGER HIDDEN DRAGON DVD Special Edition Widescreen 4 Academy Awards
CROUCHING-TIGER-HIDDEN-DRAGON-DVD-Special-Edition-Widescreen-4-Academy-Awards
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Item condition:
Very good

DVD and case in very condition.

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16 Jun, 2014 13:28:58 AEST
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Item location:
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Description

eBay item number:
161324935958
Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing.

Item specifics

Condition: Very good : Split the cost with friends
An item that is used but still in very good condition. No damage to the jewellery case or item cover, no scuffs, scratches, cracks, or holes. The cover art and liner notes are included. The VHS or DVD box is included. The video game instructions and box are included. The teeth of disk holder are undamaged. Minimal wear on the exterior of item. No skipping on CD/DVD. No fuzzy/snowy frames on VHS tape. See the seller’s listing for full details and description of any imperfections. See all condition definitions- opens in a new window or tab
Seller Notes: DVD and case in very condition.
Genre:

Foreign Language

Release Date:

05/06/2001

Sub-Genre:

Chinese/Mandarin

Rating:

PG-13

Leading Role:

Michelle Khan, Chang Chen, Ziyi Zhang, Yun-Fat Chow

Region Code:

DVD: 1

Director:

Ang Lee, Lee Ang

Edition:

Special Edition, Widescreen

Format:

DVD

UPC:

043396059900

Detailed item info

Known for making films about familial relationships, director Ang Lee surprised everyone with his martial arts epic CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON. Based on a novel by Wang Du Lu, CROUCHING TIGER starts with the revenge plot common in the wuxia stories that Lee loved as a child, then adds a feminist twist. Li Mu Bai (Chow Yun Fat) is a legendary martial artist who has decided to pass on his sword, the Green Destiny, to a friend. Soon afterward, the sword is stolen by a masked female, setting in motion events that test the bonds of family, love, duty, and sisterhood. Chow appears with three generations of female stars: Cheng Pei Pei, a 1960s action heroine; Michelle Yeoh, the beauty queen turned 1980s action goddess; and newcomer Zhang Ziyi, who smolders as the princess who wants more than domestic tranquillity. Famed action choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping (THE MATRIX) stages jaw-dropping zero-G fights across rooftops, rivers, and bamboo trees, while Yo-Yo Ma punctuates the fisticuffs with dramatic cello solos. Described by Lee as "SENSE AND SENSIBILITY with martial arts," CROUCHING TIGER recalls the best wuxia films of the 1960s and pushes the genre in new directions.

Product Details
  • Edition: Special Edition
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Rating: PG-13 (MPAA)
  • Film Country: China
  • Sound: Stereo Sound, Surround Sound
  • UPC: 043396059900

Additional Details
Genre:Foreign Films
Format:DVD
Display Format:Special Edition

"...The picture is more fun than it has a right to be....Mr. Lee puts things together artfully and stages this movie like a comedy of manners; it could be SENSE AND SENSIBILITY with a body count....It's an epic that breaks the laws of gravity."
New York Times - Elvis Mitchell (12/08/2000)

"...A triumph....CROUCHING TIGER envelops you in its exotic universe..."
Movieline's Hollywood Life - Stephen Farber (12/01/2000)

"....Always entertaining and exhilarating....CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON is most notable for going beyond genre norms..."
Sight and Sound - Tony Rayns (01/01/2001)

"...CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON defies pigeon-holing by succeeding as a love story, an action movie and a fantasy....The best acted, best shot and most exciting film of the year..." -- 5 out of 5 stars
Total Film - Cam Winstanley (02/01/2001)

"...A delightful one-of-a-kind martial arts romance where astounding fight sequences alternate with passionate yet idealistic love duets..."
Los Angeles Times - Kenneth Turan (12/15/2000)

"...Exhilarating....Ang Lee stages magnificent action sequences..."
Chicago Sun-Times - Roger Ebert (02/04/2001)

"...This Cannes/New York Film Festival favorite has it all, starting with three towering central characters....Ang Lee's film offers melodically choreographed action scenes by THE MATRIX's Yuen Wo-Ping, Oscar-caliber photography by Peter Pau and the pleasure of seeing Chow Yun Fat in his most appealing performance yet..." -- 4 out of 4 stars
USA Today - Mike Clark (12/08/2000)

Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon DVD 
Special Edition Widescreen

Special Features:

  • Digitally Mastered Audio & Anamorphic Video
  • Widescreen Presentation
  • Audio:
    • Original Language Mandarin 5.1 Dolby Digital
    • English 5.1 Dolby Digital
      and 2-Channel Dolby Surround
    • French 2-Channel Dolby Surround
    • Subtitles: English - French
    • Ang Lee and James Schamus COmmentary
    • BRAVO making of Special:
      Unleashing the Dragon
    • Photo Montage
    • Link to Website (requires internet access)
    • Filmographies
    • Animate Menus
    • Production Notes
    • Scene Selections
  • Includes free US shipping

Product Details
Actors: Chang Chen, Chow Yun-Fat, Michelle Yeoh, Zhang Ziyi, Cheng Pei-Pei
Directors: Ang Lee
Format: Closed-captioned, Subtitled, Dolby, Dubbed, Widescreen, NTSC
Language: English, Mandarin Chinese, French
Subtitles: English, French
Dubbed: English, French
Region: Region 1 encoding (US and Canada only)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
DVD Release Date: June 5, 2001
Run Time: 120 minutes

Hong Kong wuxia films, or martial arts fantasies, traditionally squeeze poor acting, slapstick humor, and silly story 
lines between elaborate fight scenes in which characters can literally fly. 

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon has no shortage of breathtaking battles, but it also has the dramatic soul of a 
Greek tragedy and the sweep of an epic romance. This is the work of director Ang Lee, who fell in love with 
movies while watching wuxia films as a youngster and made Crouching Tiger as a tribute to the form. 

To elevate the genre above its B-movie roots and broaden its appeal, Lee did two important things. 
First, he assembled an all-star lineup of talent, joining the famous Asian actors Chow Yun-fat and Michelle Yeoh 
with the striking, charismatic newcomer Zhang Ziyi. Behind the scenes, Lee called upon cinematographer Peter Pau
(The Killer, The Bride with White Hair) and legendary fight choreographer Yuen Wo-ping, best known outside
Asia for his work on The Matrix. Second, in adapting the story from a Chinese pulp-fiction novel written by 
Wang Du Lu, Lee focused not on the pursuit of a legendary sword known as "The Green Destiny," but instead
on the struggles of his female leads against social obligation. In his hands, the requisite fight scenes become
another means of expressing the individual spirits of his characters and their conflicts with society and each other.

The filming required an immense effort from all involved. Chow and Yeoh had to learn to speak Mandarin, 
which Lee insisted on using instead of Cantonese to achieve a more classic, lyrical feel. The astonishing battles 
between Jen (Zhang) and Yu Shu Lien (Yeoh) on the rooftops and Jen and Li Mu Bai (Chow) atop the branches 
of bamboo trees required weeks of excruciating wire and harness work (which in turn required meticulous 
"digital wire removal"). But the result is a seamless blend of action, romance, and social commentary in a populist 
film that, like its young star Zhang, soars with balletic grace and dignity.


"Crouching tiger hidden dragon" is a quote from Chinese mythology. It refers to hiding your strength from others; advice which is followed too well by the characters in the film.

Taiwanese-born Hong Kong actress Qi Shu was originally cast in Ziyi Zhang's role of Jen Yu and worked on the film for several weeks, until her agent pulled her from the movie to do a Pepsi commercial in Japan. (She has since changed agents!)

The only martial arts film to date to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture.

In 2001, this became the first foreign language film to earn over $100 million in the United States.

The film's action choreographer, Woo-ping Yuen, was also responsible for the fighting sequences in The Matrix (1999) and its progeny.

Dun Tan had only two weeks to compose and record the musical score.

While Ziyi Zhang's character is obviously highly trained & skillful in martial arts, the actress herself has never had any official martial arts training at all. Instead she uses her dance techniques to learn her moves in these scenes, as if they were a dance rather than a fight (which in terms of creating & filming them is actually not that far from the truth).

The film is an adaptation of the fourth novel in a pentalogy, or five-novel cycle, known in China as the Crane/Iron Pentalogy and written by noted wuxia (kung-fu) novelist Du Lu Wang. The novels are "Crane Frightens Kunlun", "Precious Sword, Golden Hairpin", "Sword's Force, Pearl's Shine", "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", and "Iron Knight, Silver Vase". Much of the story is not about Li Mu Bai and Yu Shu Lien; they are in fact secondary characters who only become important later in the series. When a comic-book adaptation of the fourth book in the pentalogy was slated, illustrator Andy Seto re-watched the film to get inspiration for how to depict the fight scenes.

The four main actors all spoke Mandarin, but with different accents. Yun-Fat Chow had a Cantonese accent, Michelle Yeoh had a Malaysian/English accent, Ziyi Zhang had a Beijing accent, and Chen Chang had a Taiwanese accent. Because of the difficulty some Chinese-speaking markets had with the voices, some markets actually had a dubbed version (into standard Mandarin) of the soundtrack.

The film holds the record for the most Oscar nominations for a "foreign" film. It was nominated for 10 Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Music (Song), Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay), Best Film Editing, and Best Costume Design.

The Green Destiny Sword used in the movie, along with other weapons in the movie, are made in Taiwan. The swordsmith is actually a neighbor of Ang Lee in his current residence in Tainan, Taiwan.

According to Yun-Fat Chow, he had to do 28 takes of his first scene on the first day of shooting because he had such difficulty speaking Mandarin. When asked in an interview with Time how he felt about his Mandarin pronunciation, he replied "It's awful".

Ziyi Zhang studied calligraphy for several months along with her other training for the movie.

Michelle Yeoh tore her ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) during the shooting of an early fighting sequence and had to be flown to the U.S. for knee surgery. She returned to the set at different times to film non-action scenes until the knee had recovered.

In Chinese, Lo's name is "Little Tiger", and Jen's name is "Gorgeous Dragon".

The Green Destiny Sword Li Mu Bai carries translates to Green Dark World Sword - a place where the dead go. The Mu in Li Mu Bai's name translates to a kind of positive jealousy or longing - as in wanting something but probably never getting it.

In the first night scene, Bo meets two night-watchmen who later give two knocks on clappers/ rods, indicating that it was the 2nd watch of the night. The first watch begins at 7 p.m. and each watch is 2 hours long, so it was after 9 p.m when Jen first sneaks into Sir Te's residence. If we were shown how many times the night-watchmen then sounds the small cymbal/gong, we would know more precisely what time it was between 9-11 p.m.

Michelle Yeoh did not speak Mandarin, and the script was presented to her phonetically with help from Mandarin-speaking crew members - her Malaysian accent can be heard throughout. Yun-Fat Chow did speak Mandarin (his first language is Cantonese) but native Mandarin speakers thought his accent strained and overdone.

#10 in the Hong Kong Film Awards' List of The Best 100 Chinese Motion Pictures. (March 2005)

The stamped documents shown by Shu Lien to the guards at the city-gate before she enters Beijing shows the date "In the of 43rd year of the reign of (Emperor) Qianlong, the sixth month, the eighth day", which is the year A.D. 1778, somewhere in June or July.

Ang Lee comments that originally he did not wish for Shu Lien to wield the heavy two-handed straight sword against Jen. This is consistent within the movie, as Shu Lien indicates her preference of the 'dao', the saber with a broad, curved blade, instead of the straight-bladed 'jian', Li Mu Bai's weapon of choice. The Green Destiny is itself a jian.

At the cave scene, Lo sings a song. This song is in one of old Turkish languages (probably Uyghur lang) which still can be understandable in today's Turkish language. Something along the lines of: "............... yiriliyorida, gordum su guzel kiz havar guni, .............. bu guzel aylari, ey guzel kiz havali kiz" As far as I understand, it means; "............. while she was singing softly, I saw that beautiful girl when sun goes down, ...................... this beautiful months, You beautiful girl, cool girl".

Foreign language film nominated for Best Picture to date with the most number of Academy Award nominations.

According to old Taiwanese newspapers, in 1959 there was a Taiwanese-speaking movie called "Luo Xiao Hu and Yu Jiao Long," an earlier adaptation of Du Lu Wang's novel. The old newspapers noted that this version was also a martial arts film. The leading actress, Hsiao Yan-Chiou, was originally traditional Taiwanese opera actress. After this movie released, Hsiao married, leaving "Luo Xiao Hu and Yu Jiao Long" as her last movie. This movie is thought to be no longer in existence now, and it seems to hold no connection with Ang Lee's "Wo Hu Cang Long" except the adaptation source.

In the hall where Shu Lien first meets Li Mubai, there are two large sets of couplets hung on the wall behind them. The inner couplet reads "(Right) The Tall (Qiao) Tree spreads thousands of branches, but don't they have the same roots; (Left) the Long (Yangtse) River flows into tens of thousand of distributaries, but all have the same source" and is about maintaining harmony. The outer couplet reads "(Right)In Spring and Autumn sacrifices, follow the Ancient Sages' Rites and Customs; (Left) Arraying Left and Right, trace One Family's Generations of Continuity" and is about maintaining tradition.

Jet Li was originally cast to play Li Mu Bai, but turned the part down to appear in Romeo Must Die (2000). The role was next offered to Hong Kong singer/actor Leon Lai but he, too, turned it down.


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