This listing was ended by the seller because the item is no longer available.

 
Posts to:
Worldwide See exclusions
Delivery:
 
Posts to:
Worldwide See exclusions

Details about  FATHERS LITTLE DIVIDEND Herald ELIZABETH TAYLOR DONALD CLARK-Baby SPENCER TRACY

See original listing
FATHERS LITTLE DIVIDEND Herald ELIZABETH TAYLOR DONALD CLARK-Baby SPENCER TRACY
FATHERS-LITTLE-DIVIDEND-Herald-ELIZABETH-TAYLOR-DONALD-CLARK-Baby-SPENCER-TRACY
Item Ended
Item condition:
--not specified

EXCELLENT, SEE DESCRIPTION FOR DETAILS

Ended:
29 Jul, 2014 02:44:53 AEST
Price:
US $4.99
 
Approximately AU $5.53(including postage)
Postage:
US $12.99 (approx. AU $14.39) USPS First Class Mail Intl / First Class Package Intl Service | See details
Item location:
Palm Springs, California, United States

Description

eBay item number:
351107708636
Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing.

Item specifics

Seller Notes: EXCELLENT, SEE DESCRIPTION FOR DETAILS
Country of Manufacture:

Spain

 

Baby Jane's Looney Bin

Visit my eBay store  


SPENCER TRACY, ELIZABETH TAYLOR & JOAN BENNETT

in 

FATHER'S LITTLE DIVIDEND

EL PADRE ES ABUELO (Spanish Title)

Vintage Film Herald from Spain

 Original Spanish herald for the release in Spain in 1953.

Size: 3 3/8 x 5 1/4" (8.7 x 13.5 cm.) approx.

Herald has publicity for the film & cinema in Spanish on the back side. Dated 17 $ 18 October 1953.

Condition: Excellent condition.

SAVE MONEY ON SHIPPING!

THERE IS NO ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL FILM HERALDS PURCHASED WITH THIS ONE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD!

I HAVE MORE VINTAGE ELIZABETH TAYLOR, SPENCER TRACY, JOAN BENNETT HERALDS, LOBBY CARDS, POSTERS, RECORDS, ETC. IN MY STORE. 

 If You Are Interested in SIMILAR ITEMS, Please:

VISIT MY EBAY STORE

Just Click Below to Visit Seller's Store:

Member has an eBay StoreBaby Jane's Looney Bin

Father's Little Dividend (1951)

Director: Vincente Minnelli

Writers: Albert Hackett (screenplay), Frances Goodrich (screenplay)

Awards: 1 win & 1 nomination

Complete credited cast:
  Spencer Tracy  ...  Stanley Banks 
  Joan Bennett  ...  Ellie Banks 
  Elizabeth Taylor  ...  Kay Dunstan 
  Don Taylor  ...  Buckley Dunstan 
  Billie Burke  ...  Doris Dunstan 
  Moroni Olsen  ...  Herbert Dunstan 
  Richard Rober  ...  Police sergeant 
  Marietta Canty  ...  Delilah (Banks' maid) 
  Russ Tamblyn  ...  Tommy Banks (as Rusty Tamblyn) 
  Tom Irish  ...  Ben Banks 
  Hayden Rorke  ...  Dr. Andrew Nordell 
  Paul Harvey  ...  Rev. Galsworthy 

rest of cast listed alphabetically:
 George Bruggeman ...  Instructor at Gym (uncredited)
 Donald Clark ...  Baby Stanley Banks Dunstan (uncredited)
 Jacqueline Duval ...  Baby Shower Participant (uncredited)
 Herbert Evans ...  Waiter at Men's Club (uncredited)
 Janey Fay ...  Baby Shower Participant (uncredited)

 Dabbs Greer ...  Green Cab Taxi Driver (uncredited)
 Harry Hines ...  Old Man (uncredited)
 Paul Kruger ...  Policeman (uncredited)

 Dick Martin ...  Man Holding Baby Stanley at Christening (uncredited)
 Joe McGuinn ...  Policeman (uncredited)
 James Menzies ...  Boy Soccer Player (uncredited)
 Thomas Menzies ...  Red - Boy Soccer Player (uncredited)
 Howard M. Mitchell ...  Policeman (uncredited)
 Lon Poff ...  Old Man on Porch (uncredited)
 Nicky Johnson Robertson ...  Baby Stanley Banks Dunstan (uncredited)
 Warren Schannon ...  Boy (uncredited)
 Erin Selwyn ...  Baby Shower Participant (uncredited)
 Frank Sully ...  Infant Service Diaper Man (uncredited)
 Beverly Thompson ...  Nurse (uncredited)
 Nancy Valentine ...  Baby Shower Participant (uncredited)
 Wendy Waldron ...  Baby Shower Participant (uncredited)
 Robert Williams ...  Traffic Policeman at Hospital (uncredited)
 George Woods ...  Policeman (uncredited)

Genres:Comedy | Romance

 

Release Date: 27 April 1951 (USA) 
 

Fun Facts
Trivia
This is one of a handful of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer productions of the 1950-1951 period whose original copyrights were never renewed and are now apparently in Public Domain; for this reason this title is now offered, often in very inferior copies, at bargain prices, by numerous VHS and DVD distributors who do not normally handle copyrighted or Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer material.

Goofs
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): The baby is christened 'Stanley Banks' but should have been christened 'Stanley Dunstan' or 'Stanley Banks Dunstan'.


This is a solid sequel to "Father of the Bride" which has some good moments, and with the same cast on hand with the similar story line. It feels very much like a direct continuation of the original. Spencer Tracy once again plays the rather hapless Stanley Banks, and again he shows how good he could be in a rather thankless role. It's almost unfortunate that he seems so natural as a flustered or put-upon husband or father, since he often played such roles although he could do so many other things as well or better. But as far as this pair of movies went, he was certainly a fine choice, since he makes the character believable and sympathetic. Tracy's character is the focal point for the common kinds of changes and adjustments that families must make as the younger generation grows up. As with the first movie, Elizabeth Taylor works very well as Kay, giving her an appealing presence and a simple believability.

Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor was born in London, England, on February 27, 1932. Although she was born an English subject, her parents were Americans, art dealers from St. Louis, Missouri (her father had gone to London to set up a gallery). Her mother had been an actress on the stage, but gave up that vocation when she married. Elizabeth lived in London until the age of seven, when the family left for the US when the clouds of war began brewing in Europe in 1939. They sailed without her father, who stayed behind to wrap up the loose ends of the art business. The family relocated to Los Angeles, where Mrs. Taylor's own family had moved. Mr. Taylor followed not long afterward. A family friend noticed the strikingly beautiful little Elizabeth and suggested that she be taken for a screen test. Her test impressed executives at Universal Picturs enough to sign her to a contract. Her first foray onto the screen was in There's One Born Every Minute (1942), released when she was ten. Universal dropped her contract after that one film, but Elizabeth was soon picked up by MGM. The first production she made with that studio was Lassie Come Home (1943), and on the strength of that one film, MGM signed her for a full year. She had minuscule parts in her next two films, The White Cliffs of Dover (1944) and Jane Eyre (1944) (the former made while she was on loan to 20th Century-Fox). Then came the picture that made Elizabeth a star: MGM's National Velvet (1944). She played Velvet Brown opposite Mickey Rooney . The film was a smash hit, grossing over $4 million. Elizabeth now had a long-term contract with MGM and was its top child star. She made no films in 1945, but returned in 1946 in Courage of Lassie (1946). In 1947, when she was 15, she starred in Life with Father (1947) with such heavyweights as William Powell , Irene Dunne and Zasu Pitts . Throughout the rest of the 1940s and into the early 1950s Elizabeth appeared in film after film with mostly good results. Her busiest year was 1954, with roles in Rhapsody (1954), Beau Brummell (1954/I), The Last Time I Saw Paris (1954) and Elephant Walk (1954). She was 22 now, and even at that young age was considered one of the world's great beauties. In 1955 she appeared in the hit Giant (1956) with James Dean . Sadly, Dean never saw the release of the film, as he died in a car accident in 1955. The next year saw Elizabeth star in Raintree County (1957), an overblown epic made, partially, in Kentucky. Critics called it dry as dust. Despite the film's shortcomings, Elizabeth was nominated for an Academy Award for her portrayal of Southern belle Susanna Drake. However, on Oscar night the honor went to Joanne Woodward for The Three Faces of Eve (1957). In 1958 Elizabeth starred as Maggie Pollitt in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958). The film received rave reviews from the critics and Elizabeth was nominated again for an Academy Award for best actress, but this time she lost to Susan Hayward in I Want to Live! (1958). She was still a hot commodity in the film world, though. In 1959 she appeared in another mega-hit and received yet another Oscar nomination for Suddenly, Last Summer (1959). Once again, however, she lost out, this time to Simone Signoret for Room at the Top (1959). Her Oscar drought ended in 1960 when she brought home the coveted statue for her flawless performance in BUtterfield 8 (1960) as Gloria Wandrous, a call girl who is involved with a married man and later dies in an auto accident. Some critics blasted the movie but they couldn't ignore her performance. There were no more films for Elizabeth for three years. She left MGM after her contract ran out, but would do projects for the studio later down the road. In 1963 she starred in Cleopatra (1963), which was one of the most expensive productions up to that time--as was her salary, a whopping $1,000,000. This was the film where she met her future and fifth husband, Richard Burton (the previous four were Conrad Hilton, Michael Wilding , Michael Todd --who died in a plane crash--and Eddie Fisher ). Her next handful of films were lackluster at best, especially 1963's The V.I.P.s (1963), which was shredded by most critics. Elizabeth was to return to fine form, however, with the role of Martha in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966). Her performance as the loudmouthed, shrewish, unkempt Martha was easily her finest to date. For this she would win her second Oscar and one that was more than well-deserved, but her films afterward didn't approach the intensity of that one. Since then she has appeared in several movies, both theatrical and made-for-television, and a number of TV programs.Her much-publicized personal life included eight marriages and several life-threatening illnesses. From the mid-1980s, Taylor championed HIV and AIDS programs; she co-founded the American Foundation for AIDS Research in 1985, and the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation in 1993. She received the Presidential Citizens Medal, the Legion of Honour, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award and a Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute, who named her seventh on their list of the "Greatest American Screen Legends". Taylor struggled with health problems much of her life; starting with her divorce from Hilton, Taylor experienced serious medical issues whenever she faced problems in her personal life. Taylor was hospitalized more than 70 times and had at least 20 major operations. Many times newspaper headlines erroneously announced that Taylor was close to death; she herself only claimed to have almost died on four occasions.

At 5'4", Taylor constantly gained and lost significant amounts of weight, reaching both 119 pounds and 180 pounds in the 1980s. She smoked cigarettes into her mid-fifties, and feared she had lung cancer in October 1975 after an X-ray showed spots on her lungs, but was later found not to have the disease. Taylor broke her back five times, had both her hips replaced, had a hysterectomy, suffered from dysentery and phlebitis, punctured her esophagus, survived a benign brain tumor operation in 1997 and skin cancer, and faced life-threatening bouts with pneumonia twice, one in 1961 requiring an emergency tracheotomy. In 1983 she admitted to having been addicted to sleeping pills and painkillers for 35 years. Taylor was treated for alcoholism and prescription drug addiction at the Betty Ford Clinic for seven weeks from December 1983 to January 1984, and again from the autumn of 1988 until early 1989.

On May 30, 2006, Taylor appeared on Larry King Live to refute the claims that she had been ill, and denied the allegations that she was suffering from Alzheimer's disease and was close to death. Near the end of her life, however, she was reclusive and sometimes failed to make scheduled appearances due to illness or other personal reasons. She used a wheelchair and when asked about it stated that she had osteoporosis and was born with scoliosis.

The mutation that gave Taylor her striking double eyelashes may also have contributed to her history of heart trouble. In November 2004, Taylor announced a diagnosis of congestive heart failure, a progressive condition in which the heart is too weak to pump sufficient blood throughout the body, particularly to the lower extremities such as the ankles and feet. In 2009 she underwent cardiac surgery to replace a leaky valve. In February 2011, new symptoms related to heart failure caused her to be admitted into Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles for treatment, where she remained until her death at age 79 on March 23, 2011, surrounded by her four children.

She was buried in a private Jewish ceremony, presided over by Rabbi Jerry Cutler, the day after she died, at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. Taylor is entombed in the Great Mausoleum, where public access to her tomb is restricted. At her request, the funeral began 15 minutes after it was scheduled to begin; as her representative told the media "She even wanted to be late for her own funeral."

Marriages, romances, and children
Taylor was married eight times to seven husbands. When asked why she married so often, she replied, "I don't know, honey. It sure beats the hell out of me,=", but also said that, "I was taught by my parents that if you fall in love, if you want to have a love affair, you get married. I guess I'm very old-fashioned." Taylor's husbands were:

Conrad "Nicky" Hilton (May 6, 1950 – January 29, 1951): Taylor believed that she was in love with the young hotel heir, but also wanted to escape her mother. Hilton's "gambling, drinking, and abusive behavior", however, horrified her and her parents, caused a miscarriage, and ended the marriage in divorce after nine months.
Michael Wilding (February 21, 1952 – January 26, 1957): The "gentle" Wilding, 20 years older than Taylor, comforted her after leaving Hilton. After their divorce Taylor admitted that "I gave him rather a rough time, sort of henpecked him and probably wasn't mature enough for him."
 
Michael Todd (February 2, 1957 – March 22, 1958): Todd's death ended Taylor's only marriage not to result in divorce. Although their relationship was tumultuous, she later called him one of the three loves of her life, along with Burton and jewelry.

Eddie Fisher (May 12, 1959 – March 6, 1964): Fisher, Todd's best friend, consoled Taylor after Todd's death. They began an affair while Fisher was still married to Debbie Reynolds, causing a scandal; Reynolds eventually forgave Taylor; she voted for her when Taylor was nominated for an Oscar for BUtterfield 8, and starred with her in These Old Broads.

Richard Burton (March 15, 1964 – June 26, 1974): The Vatican condemned Burton and Taylor's affair, which began when both were married to others, as "erotic vagrancy". The press closely followed their relationship before, during, and after their ten years of marriage, due to great public interest in "the most famous film star in the world and the man many believed to be the finest classical actor of his generation." Taylor wanted to focus on her marriage rather than her career, and gained weight in an unsuccessful attempt to not receive film roles.

Richard Burton (October 10, 1975 – July 29, 1976): Sixteen months after divorcing—Burton said, "You can't keep clapping a couple of sticks [of dynamite] together without expecting them to blow up"—they remarried in a private ceremony in Kasane, Botswana, but soon separated and redivorced in 1976.
John Warner (December 4, 1976 – November 7, 1982): As with Burton, Taylor sought to be known as the wife of her husband, a Republican United States Senator from Virginia. Unhappy with her life in Washington, however, Taylor became depressed and entered the Betty Ford Clinic.

Larry Fortensky (October 6, 1991 – October 31, 1996): Taylor and Fortensky met during another stay at the Betty Ford Clinic and were married at the Neverland Ranch.

Taylor had many romances outside her marriages. Before marrying Hilton she was engaged to both Heisman Trophy winner Glenn Davis—who did not know until the relationship ended that Taylor's mother had encouraged it to build publicity for her daughter —and the son of William D. Pawley, the United States Ambassador to Brazil. Howard Hughes promised Taylor's parents that if they would encourage her to marry him, the enormously wealthy industrialist and film producer would finance a movie studio for her; Sara Taylor agreed, but Taylor refused. After she left Hilton, Hughes returned, proposing to Taylor by suddenly landing a helicopter nearby and sprinkling diamonds on her. Other dates included Frank Sinatra, Henry Kissinger, and Malcolm Forbes. In 2007 Taylor denied rumors of a ninth marriage to her partner Jason Winters, but referred to him as "one of the most wonderful men I've ever known."
 
Taylor had two sons, Michael Howard (born January 6, 1953) and Christopher Edward (born February 27, 1955), with Michael Wilding. She had a daughter, Elizabeth Frances "Liza" (born August 6, 1957), with Michael Todd. During her marriage to Eddie Fisher, Taylor started proceedings to adopt a two-year-old girl from Germany, Maria (born August 1, 1961); the adoption process was finalized in 1964 following their divorce. Richard Burton later adopted Taylor's daughters Liza and Maria.

In 1971, Taylor became a grandmother at the age of 39. At the time of her death, she was survived by her four children, ten grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Legacy
Portrait of Elizabeth TaylorTaylor has been called the "greatest movie star of all", writes biographer William J. :2 A child star at the age of 12, she soon after launched into public awareness by MGM and a string of successful films, many of which are today considered "classics". Her resulting celebrity made her into a Hollywood icon, as she set the "gold standard" for Hollywood fame, and "created the model for stardom".

Other observers, such as social critic Camille Paglia, similarly describe Taylor as "the greatest actress in film history," partly as a result of the "liquid realm of emotion" she expressed on screen. Paglia describes the effect Taylor had in some of her films:

An electric, erotic charge vibrates the space between her face and the lens. It is an extrasensory, pagan phenomenon.
Taylor had a major role in sparking the sexual revolution of the 1960s, as she pushed the envelope on sexuality: She was one of the first major stars to pose (mostly) nude in Playboy, and among the first to remove her clothes onscreen. In A Place in the Sun, filmed when she was 17, her surprising maturity shocked Hollywood columnist Hedda Hopper, who wrote of her precocious sexuality. Film historian Andrew Sarris describes her love scenes in the film with Montgomery Clift as "unnerving—sybaritic—like gorging on chocolate sundaes".

In real life, she was considered "a star without airs", notes Mann. Writer Gloria Steinem likewise described her as a "movie queen with no ego...expert at what she does, uncatty in her work relationships with other actresses". Mike Nichols, who directed her in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), said that of all the actors he’s worked with, Taylor had the "most democratic soul". Mann adds that she treated electricians and studio crew the "same way she would a Rothschild at a charity gala".Director George Cukor told Taylor that she possessed "that rarest of virtues—simple kindness".

Taylor's ex-husband, actor Richard Burton, who co‑starred with her on various films, expressed great admiration for her talent as an actress. Burton said, "I think she's one of the most underrated screen actresses that ever lived, and I think she's one of the best ones who ever lived. At her finest she's incomparable."

Awards and honorsMain article: List of awards and nominations received by Elizabeth Taylor
Taylor won two Academy Awards for Best Actress, for her performance in BUtterfield 8 in 1960, and for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in 1966. Additionally, she received the Jean Herscholt Humanitarian Academy Award in 1992 for her work fighting AIDS.

In 1994 a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars was dedicated to her.

In 1997 Taylor was honored by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) with the Life Achievement Award. As Taylor could not be in attendance, Gregory Peck read the following statement on her behalf:

I’m so disappointed that I can’t be there with all of you tonight. Please know that I am watching. And this award is especially important to me because it’s given by my peers. Not only for my first career, acting – but, for what has now become my life, the eradication of the AIDS epidemic.
As we all know, ours was one of the first industries to be directly and dramatically affected by the AIDS epidemic. And it’s heartening to me that this community has risen to the challenge. And the foundation of the Screen Actors Guild, of which I’m so proud to be a member, is no exception having made a very generous donation to the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation. Thank you all for honoring me tonight.

Love, Elizabeth.

Taylor received the French Legion of Honour in 1987, and in 2000 was named a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In 2001, she received a Presidential Citizens Medal for her humanitarian work, most notably for helping to raise more than $200 million for AIDS research and bringing international attention and resources to addressing the epidemic. Taylor was inducted into the California Hall of Fame in 2007.

Books
Taylor was the subject of at least 53 books as of 2006; Kitty Kelley wrote the first unauthorized biography of the actress in 1981, which Taylor denounced. She never wrote a comprehensive autobiography due to her desire for privacy, but did publish several books besides My Love Affair with Jewelry. Taylor's first, Nibbles and Me (1946), discussed the child star's "adventures with her pet chipmunk". Reviewers criticized another, Elizabeth Taylor (1964), for being uninteresting and lacking in new information. She received a $750,000 advance payment for Elizabeth Takes Off: On Weight Gain, Weight Loss, Self-Image and Self-Esteem (1988).

WHAT IS A FILM HERALD?

Heralds were made from the 1910s to the 1960s. Theaters would order heralds by the thousands (they usually cost around $3 per thousand!). They would then hire people to stand on busy street corners and pass them out to all who walked by. Since the vast majority of people looked at the herald for a moment and then threw it away, it is not surprising that not many heralds survive. In Europe many heralds were simply printed on a two sided piece of paper.  One side was printed with graphics (often colorful) and artwork from the film and the back side could be blank or in many cases would have information about the film and/or where or when it was playing.  Most American heralds were on a single sheet of paper that was folded in half, creating four small pages. The front of the herald usually has just the title of the movie and images of the stars (like a small poster) and the two middle pages usually have a lot of information about the movie along with more images (and sometimes these images are found nowhere but the herald). The back page is usually blank for the theater to print in their name and play dates, to let people know where the movie was playing and when. Sometimes one or more of the pages were full-color, and often some of the pages were two-color. A herald is usually the most inexpensive way to get an original item from a classic movie! Most pressbooks would have a sample herald glued in to the first or last page of the pressbook.

PACKAGING & SHIPPING

  I PACKAGE MY RECORDS AND OTHER ITEMS CAREFULLY WITH APPROPRIATE MATERIALS.  MY SHIPPING CHARGES ARE CAREFULLY CALCULATED TO COVER MY COSTS FOR SHIPPING BOXES, PACKAGING MATERIALS, GASOLINE AND MYRIADS OF OTHER FEES AND CHARGES I MUST PAY TO CONTINUE AFFORDABLE SHIPPING.  I GLADLY COMBINE SHIPMENTS TO REDUCE CHARGES WHEN POSSIBLE, BUT SHIPPING RATES ARE NOT NEGOTIABLE. 

RETURN & INSURANCE POLICY FOR ALL BUYERS:

ANY UNDAMAGED ITEM MAY BE RETURNED WITHIN SEVEN DAYS OF RECEIPT FOR A FULL HIGHLY ADVISED.  I ALWAYS PROVIDE DELIVERY CONFIRMATION OR TRACKING IN THE USA.REFUND LESS SHIPPING COSTS.  ALL ITEMS SHIPPED UNINSURED ARE AT THE BUYERS OWN RISK FOR DAMAGE OR LOSS.  INSURANCE IS ALWAYS AVAILABLE FOR EXACT COST IN THE USA AND IS

INTERNATIONAL BUYERS POLICY:

UNFORTUNATELY INSURANCE AND TRACKING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR NON-US BUYERS IF YOU CHOOSE FIRST CLASS INTERNATIONAL OR INTERNATIONAL PRIORITY FLAT RATE, ONLY FOR REGULAR INTERNATIONAL PRIORITY OR EXPRESS MAIL.  WHEN YOU CHOOSE FIRST CLASS INTERNATIONAL MAIL AND INSURANCE, YOUR SHIPPING WILL BE AUTOMATICALLY UPGRADED TO INSURED INTERNATIONAL PRIORITY MAIL WITH RECORDED DELIVERY.   THIS IS THE SAFEST WAY TO RECEIVE YOUR ITEM.  I CANNOT ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR ITEMS SHIPPED BY FIRST CLASS INTERNATIONAL UNINSURED, AS THERE IS NO WAY TO TRACK THEM AND NO RECOURSE IF THEY ARE DAMAGED OR LOST.  

If You Are Interested in SIMILAR ITEMS, Please:

VISIT MY EBAY STORE

Just Click Below to Visit Seller's Store:

Member has an eBay StoreBaby Jane's Looney Bin

Created by eBay Blackthorne ver. 3.1.121.0

Questions and answers about this item

No questions or answers have been posted about this item.




00010

Place bid

Time left:
Current bid:
(Approximately ##1##)
Shipping:
Import charges:
Your max bid:
Your max bid:
By clicking Confirm bid, you commit to buy this item from the seller if you're the winning bidder.
By clicking Confirm bid, you are committing to buy this item from the seller if you are the winning bidder and have read and agreed to the Global Shipping Program terms and conditions - opens in a new window or tab. Import charges previously quoted are subject to change if you increase you maximum bid amount.
Cancel
Loading...
Resume bidding, if the page does not update immediately.
Place bid
Review and confirm your bid
Bid confirmation
d
h
m
s
day
hour
hours
FREE postage
See item description
(Approximately ##1##)
(Enter ##1## or more)
(Enter more than ##1##)
Your max bid:
Increase max bid
Place bid
Confirm bid
Increase max bid
Cancel
Change bid
Close
, you've been outbid. Don't let it get away - bid again!
, you're the highest bidder on this item. Good luck
, you're the first bidder. Hope you win!
, you're currently the high bidder, but you're close to getting outbid.
, this auction is almost over and you're currently the high bidder.
, you're the high bidder, but the reserve price hasn't been met.
Please enter your bid again.
Please enter a valid number as the bid price.
Enter an amount that is equal or greater than the minimum bid required. This can be found under the bid entry box.
Maximum bids can't be lowered once they're submitted.
This seller requires the buyer to have a PayPal account to purchase this item. Get a PayPal account here .
Your bid is greater than or equal to the Buy It Now price. We recommend you purchase this item via Buy It Now. If you still wish to bid, you may do so below.
Time left:
Current bid:
(approximately ##1##)
Your maximum bid:
(approximately ##1##)
Increase your maximum bid:
By clicking 1 Click Bid, you commit to buy this item from the seller if you're the winning bidder. Learn moreabout 1-click bid - opens in a new window or tab
day
hour
min
sec
days
hours
mins
secs
(approximately ##1##)
Winning bid:
Starting bid:
Close
Congratulations! The auction has ended and you're the winner.
The auction has ended, but the reserve price was not met.
Sorry, the auction has ended and you were outbid.
Good news, you're the high bidder.
Sorry, you've been outbid.
You're the high bidder, but the reserve price is not met.
Please enter a higher amount than the current bid.
Maximum bids can't be lowered once submitted.
Please enter a valid number.