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Coffee percolators for your delicious cuppa

Gone are the days where you have to go to a cafe to enjoy a delicious Espresso or latte. There are two distinct types of coffee percolators, which are electric and non electric. Electric and cordless coffee percolators have an independent base. Stovetop coffee percolators are warmed up on the stove like some kettles and are a cracking option for camping trips, especially when tea doesn't quite cut it.

Different types of coffee percolators

Stainless steel coffee percolators are available in a variety of elegant traditional styles and modern designs. Choose from 2, 4, 6, and 10 cup options. The coffee makers have a durable construction and are rust resistant.

Coffee percolators that are made from aluminium are lightweight and typically modelled on classic Italian design. Vintage glass coffee percolators are usually made from Pyrex. Modern styles boast a jug shape for easy pouring.

Standard features of coffee percolators

Coffee percolators are comprised of five parts. These are the percolator coffee pot, the hollow metal tube stem that fits into the bottom of the pot, the filter basket that holds the ground coffee, the perforated filter basket cover, and the coffee pot lid.

Some coffee percolators also have a glass bubble in the lid that allows you to watch the coffee spurting up from the tube.

How to make your own delicious brew in your coffee percolator

If making coffee in an electric coffee percolator, plug in the appliance and turn it on. You will need to allow it to ‘perk' for a while.

Stovetop coffee percolators need to be placed over a low flame to heat the water. When the first spurt of coffee hits the little glass bubble, turn the heat down immediately. Once it stops perking, remove it from the heat.

Carefully remove the lid of the coffeemaker and remove the entire filter stem. If you leave the filter stem inside the percolator pot, the steam from the coffee will continue to condense. This will cause spent coffee grounds to drip into your coffee.

Pour into a cup and enjoy.

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