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Bamboo, wood, or rattan, it's all a case of antique Asian baskets

Antique Chinese baskets have a multitude of practical applications. Used for the storage and transport of tea, opium, and rice, for the giving of gifts, as containers for food, or to hold artist and scholars' supplies, there's sure to be some Asian antiques to suit your collection. Pair a basket with an antique Asian box to benefit from the stylish oriental design.

The items are utilitarian objects as they deploy an ingenious quality of engineering that utilises the very minimum amount of material resource, such as woven bamboo, rattan, or wood. Alongside this, the various finishing processes applied with lacquer and paint mean they are highly decorative objects that assist in identifying their original function. These qualities make them ideal for complementing furniture and furnishings.

An antique basket full of love

Tiered woven baskets have traditionally been used as bridal dowry baskets for Chinese weddings. Wrapped in a red ribbon that symbolises joy and love, these baskets were once filled with food for the wedding party. These days the baskets are still presented to the bride and are filled with anything and everything a bride may need as she enters into her new married life.

These delicate yet strong antique weddings baskets make ideal storage for sewing kits, with their lower tiered interior perfect for holding heavier fabrics and tools, with lighter items such as needles, pins, and threads resting in the top for ease of access.

Similar objects from all across south-east Asia can be found as highly functional in their form. Antique trays used as bowls for serving fish or for carrying and displaying temple offerings are an example of this common use as they are produced and utilised in countries such as Tibet, Thailand, and China. These wooden trays are ideal for your home or as a gift for displaying items such as fruit or keeping jewellery.

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