Got one to sell?

Got one to sell?

Get it in front of 160+ million buyers.

Keep Your Livestock Secure with an Electric Fence

Electric fences have a bad reputation. Just the name of them conjures up images of the electric chair or something brutal. The reality is that electric fences can be far more humane than other options–it's just the notion that seems unsettling. These fences are also relatively easy to install. All you need is some fence chargers, the wiring, electric fence insulators and some fence posts.

Electric Fences Can Be More Humane

While normal fences may look harmless, they can actually be quite dangerous to animals. They often have to use several layers of wire in order to become an effective barrier. The unfortunate result of this is that it can lead to animals getting trapped. If they aren't found soon, they can quickly die of dehydration. Barbed wire fences are also unsafe because the spikes can cause brutal injuries to animals.

Electric fences only require posts and a few strands of wire alongside the electric fence insulators. The fences shock animals, but they don't cause them any long term damage. The relatively simple structure prevents animals from being caught and they can't receive the long term injuries that barbed wire can give.

Electric Fences Can Be Cheaper

One of the main advantages of electric fences is that they are cheaper to construct than other kinds. This is because the fences don't need to physically restrain the livestock, meaning that they can use much lighter construction. Rather than having to be sturdy enough to keep cows and other animals inside, they just need thin wires connected to posts with electric fence insulators. The shock provides the necessary force to keep the animals within the boundaries.

Electric Fences Can Be Flexible

Electric fences can be installed quickly and easily moved around. This makes them much more suitable for temporary fencing in comparison to other kinds that require more significant construction. Electric fences allow you to adjust your pastures as necessary with the changing seasons and conditions.

Tell us what you think - opens in new window or tab