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Mini-ITX Computer Motherboards

If you're looking for computer motherboards with low noise and power consumption, as well as a compact size, then a Mini-ITX may be the solution. They can handle a whole range of tasks that put them on par with a modern desktop PC, while offering a much quieter operation that makes them ideal for a diverse range of applications.

What is a Mini-ITX Motherboard?

Mini-ITX computer motherboards originated in 2001 as embedded circuit boards for industrial use to provide fan-less cooling with low power consumption.

  • They later became particularly popular in home theatre PC systems where minimal fan noise was desirable so as not to detract from the film.
  • A Mini-ITX motherboard measures just 17-by-17 centimetres, making it ideal for small computers.

Why Should I Purchase a Mini-ITX Motherboard?

The compact size of a Mini-ITX motherboard is its most defining factor and makes it useful in a number of situations.

  • If you've got a home theatre PC, the low power CPU and graphics processor of a Mini-ITX system makes it ideal and it can easily fit inside a TV cabinet.
  • They're a good solution for situations where space is at a premium, such as in small home offices or desk cubicles, with Mini-ITX computer cases around the size of a large shoe box.
  • Mini-ITX motherboards weigh between four and seven kilogrammes, meaning you can transport them, when necessary, to gaming parties or if you're living a transient lifestyle.

Which Factors Should I Look For In a Mini-ITX Motherboard?

Mini-ITX computer power supplies tend to come with fewer ports and connectors than their larger counterparts, so it's important to make sure it has all the features you need before purchase.

  • Look for a PCI Express x16 slot, which is capable of accommodating most modern expansion cards.
  • Opt for at least three SATA connectors so you can install a main hard drive, a DVD/Blu-ray drive and have a port free for another hard disk or solid-state drive.
  • Check which display ports your monitor accepts and make sure that the motherboard you're thinking about purchasing has those same ports.
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