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Wooden Educational Toys

A child's early years are the most important when it comes to sparking their creativity and attitude for learning. Between years one to five, your child would be just starting to take in the world around them. Everything is going to be fascinating to them, and their minds are going to be working at top speed to learn about anything new they come across. Educational toys can help nurture their natural curiosity. They can also help strengthen other skills that your child will be developing in their toddler years.

Benefits of Wooden Educational Toys

Toys and games sometimes get a bad reputation when children spend too much time on them. However, they are extremely beneficial when used in a controlled manner and with adult supervision. They can help fine motor skill development in young children and also train a child's hand-eye coordination, colour and object recognition and counting skills. Furthermore, Wooden puzzles help nurture a child's problem-solving skills. Generally, the range available encourages children to use their vast and limitless imagination. Wooden toys in particular are good because they are sturdy, long-lasting and withstand potential rough play. Unlike metal or steel toys, they do not rust and cause less severe injuries, should an accident happen.

Wooden Educational Toy Types

Many types of wooden educational toy sets are available. They share some similar benefits and goals, but they are also creatively unique. This makes playtime forever interesting for your child. Some blocks and puzzles feature numbers, while others, such as alphabet wooden toys, may help literacy. Moreover, tool kits or assembly type puzzles teach children problem-solving and practices their fine motor skills. Some wooden play food come attached together by Velcro patches, and children can learn to break them apart using a toy knife to play pretend while putting their hand-eye coordination to use at the same time.

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